What causes dating violence

"They need to feel safe telling a parent."Teens often hide the abuse from their parents, Spinks-Franklin says.Teens may not be able to confide in friends, either, because abusers sometimes isolate their victims from loved ones.Mothers living with partners who have alcohol use disorder tended to be more depressed and, as a result, were less warm and sensitive in their interactions with their children, beginning in infancy.“This is significant because children with warm and sensitive mothers are better able to regulate their emotions and behavior,” Livingston says.

Medline Plus also links to health information from non-government Web sites.Many teens reported being assaulted multiple times, according to the study, based on the CDC's Youth Behavior Risk Surveillance System using questionnaires answered by more than 13,000 high school students."If there is violence once, there is likely to be violence again," Spinks-Franklin says."It has to be taken very seriously."Spinks-Franklin say she has seen violence even among relationships between 10- and 11-year-olds."If a parent is concerned that a child is in an unhealthy relationship, they need to address it, but do it in a way that doesn't make the child shut down," she says.“Our research suggests the risk for violence can be lessened when parents are able to be more warm and sensitive in their interactions with their children during the toddler years.This in turn can reduce marital conflict and increase the children’s self-control, and ultimately reduce involvement in aggressive behavior.”BUFFALO, N. -- Having a parent with an alcohol use disorder increases the risk for dating violence among teenagers, according to a study from the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions.

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