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For the rest of us, according to the matching hypothesis, we are more likely to love those who are equally as attractive as we are.

'Punching above your weight' is a concept we're all familiar with when it comes to commenting, usually bitterly, on other couples. one partner has loads of money or an aristocratic heritage)?

In 2011, researchers conducted experiments on more than 1,000 people, showing them photographs of members of the opposite sex and asking them how attractive the people in the photos were.

Results showed that men rated women most attractive when they looked happy and least attractive when they displayed pride.

But what's less clear is how to get into that position yourself. Or to be less cynical, is it something to do with 'what's inside'? It's true that, broadly, people tend to pair up with others who are genetically and physically similar to themselves – or if you're being reductive, '10s' end up with '10s' and '7s' end up with '7s'.

Scientists call this 'assortative mating', and the loose explanation is that we do so to avoid our partners being lured away by more attractive competition.

But a study published last year in the journal posits a theory as to how and why the exception to 'assortative mating' occurs, and it's all about the 'friend zone'.

Results showed that people were twice as likely to say that they wanted to see their partners again when those partners moved their hands and arms, compared to when their partners sat still.Women, on the other hand, rated men most attractive when they displayed pride and least attractive when they looked happy.Interestingly, shame was pretty attractive in both men and women.Decades of studies have shown that the cliché that "opposites attract" is totally off."Partners who are similar in broad dispositions, like personality, are more likely to feel the same way in their day-to-day lives," said Gian Gonzaga, lead author of a study of couples who met on e Harmony If you stare into each other's eyes for two minutes University of Massachusetts psychologist Joan Kellerman asked 72 unacquainted undergrads to pair off and stare into each other's eyes for two minutes.

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